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Hue review for Nintendo Switch | Color me impressed

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    Hue review for Nintendo Switch from Fiddlesticks and Curve Digital

    I love puzzle games to death. So when I heard of Hue, a puzzle platformer that centered around using the colors of the rainbow, I was all in. Henry Hoffman, Dan Da Rocha, and everyone at Fiddlesticks truly made a fantastic puzzle platformer that I found incredibly charming and challenging.

    Changing the world with color

    Hue has great puzzles | Hue review for Nintendo Switch from Fiddlesticks and Curve Digital

    In this game, you play as the titular Hue as you solve various puzzles to find your lost mother. In a dark, gray world, Hue is able to use an item called the Color Ring. This ring allows him to change the color of the world in order to remove obstacles. For example, if something blue is in the way, turning the world blue will cause the object to disappear.

    This concept sounds simple enough, but Hue takes this idea and runs with it. There were numerous puzzles that stumped me for a while, and I even had to have my wife help me with some.

    The interesting thing about the puzzles in Hue is that it made me look at the world differently than other video games do. I often thought that I messed up and I would have to start the puzzle over again. But Hue‘s puzzle design is flawless. When I thought I had trapped myself, I discovered that I wasn’t thinking about the situation properly.

    The question I often found myself asking was, “How will the world change if I do this?” Finding the answer to this question made the solution to each puzzle satisfying and rewarding.

    Hue also has plenty of secret items to find. There were plenty of hidden paths that I had to go back to in order to grab hidden gems. So if you like optional bonuses in puzzle games, this will be right up your alley.

    A visual masterpiece with accessibility options

    Hue looks outstanding | Hue review for Nintendo Switch from Fiddlesticks and Curve Digital

    Hue also offers stunning visuals. Even though the color palette is simple, the game is gorgeous and never dropped a single frame. This was true of both handheld and docked modes.

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    Speaking of the Nintendo Switch, this version of Hue features HD rumble. However, I rarely noticed it. I often just shrugged it off as normal controller vibrations.

    In the sound department, Hue offers soothing tracks that most often let the piano shine. These calming tracks help you really think out each puzzle. It also fits the tone of the game as Hue desperately tracks down his mother.

    You might be worried you can’t enjoy the wonders of Hue if you’re colorblind. Fortunately, there is a colorblind mode that makes the game accessible to more people. When you turn this option on, the colors in the game will be labeled with a symbol to match each color on your ring.

    A puzzle-platforming triumph

    a bit of a mess | Hue review for Nintendo Switch from Fiddlesticks and Curve Digital

    Even though I loved almost every second of Hue, I did have some issues with the game. There were a couple of glitches that made me restart a couple of rooms, and the game is a bit short. But I still think my time was absolutely worth it.

    Hue is a wonderful, challenging puzzle platformer that I would recommend to anybody. Despite its short length, your enjoyment of the puzzles and the unraveling of the story will make your purchase worthwhile.

    Release Date: June 6, 2019
    No. of Players: 1 player
    Category: Puzzle, Platformer
    Publisher: Curve Digital
    Developer: Fiddlesticks

    A review code was provided by the publisher

    Our review policy.

    Hue

    $9.99
    9

    Overall Score

    9.0/10

    Pros

    • Fun and challenging puzzles
    • Visually stunning
    • Relaxing soundtrack
    • Intriguing story
    • Accessibility options

    Cons

    • A couple of glitches
    • A little too short

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