Pokémon Masters $26 million revenue first week - Sensor Tower

Breaking news: Game that everyone expected to make a lot of money has made a lot of money. Sorry, I should’ve told you to sit down and hold on tight before I dropped that bombshell on you, but now you know. According to Sensor Tower, Pokémon Masters has generated an estimated $26 million in revenue in its first week on the market.

Granted, Sensor Tower always deals in intelligence and approximations, so the precise accuracy of numbers can’t be guaranteed. But they’re pretty much the only group trying to work out this data on an ongoing basis, and it’s probably in the ballpark.

Pokémon Masters $26 million revenue first week - Sensor Tower

As we can see, Pokémon Masters doesn’t come close to touching the numbers of Pokémon GO, but the difference is actually even more extreme than the graph suggests at a glance. Masters was released in over 60 markets at launch, whereas Pokémon GO‘s first-week $56 million was the result of only being available in five regions. Still, I hardly think developer DeNA is upset to have made tens of millions of dollars with Masters this week.

Sensor Tower gets more specific about where Pokémon Masters generated its revenue:

Players in Japan contributed the largest portion of the game’s launch week spending at approximately $16 million, or about 62 percent of the total. Our data shows that nearly $4.5 million, or about 17 percent of all spending, has come from the U.S. Hong Kong, Taiwan, and France represented the remainder of the title’s top five markets in week one. The majority of spending so far has been on iOS devices at 72 percent, with Google Play accounting for the remaining 28 percent.

We previously reported that the game had earned 10 million downloads in just four days, so it’s fair to say the game is on track so far.

This weekend, stay tuned for our beginners guide with tips to get started in Pokémon Masters. Check back soon!

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John Friscia
Proofs Editor for Enthusiast Gaming. I'm a writer who loves Super Nintendo and Japanese role-playing games to an impractical degree. I have recently returned from living in South Korea.

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