Gear.Club Unlimited 2 - Tracks Edition review for Nintendo Switch

Back in 2017, when the Switch was still a youngling, Eden Games proclaimed that it would have a treat for sim-racing fans with Gear.Club Unlimited. Touted proudly as an exclusive built with the Switch in mind, Gear.Club Unlimited seemed to be set up to be a major advancement for the sim-racing genre on Nintendo systems; a genre which has long been ignored in this space. It appears that Eden did get the word of its franchise out there, as both the first and second entries of the series have collectively sold over one million units.

Microids, the publishers behind both titles has commented on the milestone achievement. The statement comes from the company’s CEO Stéphane Longeard, who says:

“The great results of the Gear.Club Unlimited franchise illustrates the strength of the brand and allows Microids to be confident in the future of the franchise. This new record consolidates our editorial strategy revolving around four pillars: Adventure, racing, retro and strong IPs.”

Gear.Club Unlimited 2 - Porsche Edition

Caution lights

The first part of Longeard’s statement suggests that Microids is considering producing more entries in the Gear.Club Unlimited franchise. Since the release of the second entry in 2018, there hasn’t been any new development outside of the Tracks Edition expansion that GCU2 got in 2020.

If Microids does go ahead and create a Gear.Club Unlimited 3, the critically mixed reception of the first two titles should certainly be taking into account. Right here on Nintendo Enthusiast, I  Gear.Club Unlimited 2 was considered to be an underwhelming experience. While it’s certainly not a bad game, it was a much weaker package than what it seemed to be making itself try to appear as. Despite being exclusive to the Switch, it didn’t make any meaningful use of the hardware’s power, even when compared to similar titles that came out on weaker hardware, like GRID Autosport. In terms of gameplay mechanics, the actual driving model wasn’t great nor was the progression.

All of these are areas that I believe that Eden Games can improve on. Regardless, it seems that Eden and Microids’ marketing must have worked considering the sales milestone. While it’s unfortunate to see from a critic’s perspective, I hope the success drives the developers to keep pushing harder in order to deliver consistently better products.

[Thanks, Nintendo Everything]

A.K Rahming
Having been introduced to video games at the age of 3 via a Nintendo 64, A.K has grown up in the culture. A fan of simulators and racers, with a soft spot for Nintendo! But, he has a great respect for the entire video game world and enjoys watching it all expand as a whole.

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