Nintendo-Wii-Remotes

Nintendo has long found itself in legal hot water from various companies that try to insist that the Japanese giant is infringing on one of their patents. This act, colloquially known as “patent trolling” among the gaming community, seems to rear its ugly head against Nintendo almost every year. But, oftentimes, the Big N does manage to come out on top, and that’s exactly what’s happened in this most recent case involving the technology found in the Wii Remote.

The case involving Nintendo of America v iLife Technologies Inc. was formally put to a close just recently with the judgment being ruled in favor of the Japanese giant. The case involved iLife trying to sue the Big N over the motion-control technology that is in the well-known Wii Remote, as the company claimed that Nintendo was infringing on its patents. A statement was released by Ajay Singh, who is the Deputy General Counsel at Nintendo of America. Have a look:

“Nintendo has a long history of developing new and unique products, and we are pleased that, after many years of litigation, the court agreed with Nintendo. We will continue to vigorously defend our products against companies seeking to profit off of technology they did not invent.”

This particular case between Nintendo and iLife has been ongoing since 2013. Thus, it really has been a long road. At the end of it all, Nintendo is walking away with a whopping $10.1 million being awarded to it. It’s kind of ironic that this case concluded over 13 years since the Wii Remote was first held in the hands of the public, and the Wii (and Wii U) have both been long out of production.

Over on the other side of the globe, in Europe, the Big N won another court case where Norway and Germany were trying to sue the company for having a no-refund policy for eShop pre-orders. The court agreed in favor of Nintendo, thus allowing it to continue enforcing this policy.

[VIA]

 

A.K Rahming
Having been introduced to video games at the age of 3 via a Nintendo 64, A.K has grown up in the culture. A fan of simulators and racers, with a soft spot for Nintendo! But, he has a great respect for the entire video game world and enjoys watching it all expand as a whole.

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