Sokodice review Nintendo Switch The Socially Awkward Studio casual puzzle game

As much as I love story in video games, sometimes all I want is something straight to the point with no fluff. Something I can easily pick up and put down at a moment’s notice and not be any worse off for doing so, even if I don’t come back for a week or more. This is exactly the experience I found with The Socially Awkward Studio’s Sokodice, a dice-rolling puzzle title new to the Nintendo Switch eShop.

Sokodice review Nintendo Switch The Socially Awkward Studio casual puzzle game

Sokodice is a natural fit on Switch. Featuring over 100 brief levels across 11 worlds, it almost feels like it’s inviting you to play in short bursts when you have a few minutes to spare. The goal of each level is to rotate the provided dice around the map in such a way that they land on the numbered spaces with that particular number on the top face of the die. For instance, if you have a space labeled 2, the puzzle is not complete until the die on top of it is showing a 2 on its top side; any other orientation will not work.

Across the 11 worlds in Sokodice, you’ll be introduced to a variety of new mechanics. My favorite of these are the dice that send out a force push in the direction they moved, causing any dice in its path to immediately move a space back if able. Other mechanics include fire dice that destroy the tiles they land on, ice dice/paths that cause constant motion until you hit an edge or regular tile, and dice that rotate automatically each time you move one. These new mechanics are introduced at an appropriate pace, allowing you time to get used to playing with them before more are added. Of course, by the end, you’ll have to deal with several of these mechanics at once, making for some intense puzzles.

Sokodice review Nintendo Switch The Socially Awkward Studio casual puzzle game

As a result of this, I feel like the difficulty curve is pretty fair. The early puzzles are fairly straightforward, and it’s easy to meet the gold medal move requirement, even when multiple dice are thrown into the mix. By the end, however, hitting those golds proved to be a massive challenge that I still haven’t fully completed. Thankfully, these gold medals are completely optional, but the later puzzles still pose quite a challenge even without going for the gold.

There isn’t really much to complain about with Sokodice, mostly because what you see is what you get. It’s fairly simply designed and it works well. If there is one thing I would’ve liked to have seen added in, it would’ve been a hint system of some sort. I suppose this isn’t even a huge deal though since there is no upper limit on move count, so in most cases, you can toy around with it until something works. However, there’s at least one level I still have nightmares about though, where even beating it at all was a miracle, so hints would’ve been appreciated.

Sokodice review Nintendo Switch The Socially Awkward Studio casual puzzle game

If you’re in the mood for a mobile-like puzzle experience, I highly recommend Sokodice on Nintendo Switch. Conceptually, it’s easy to pick up, new mechanics are regularly added to increase puzzle variety and difficulty, and it’s practically designed to fit perfectly in those little gaps in your day when you only have a few minutes to spare. A hint system would’ve been a nice addition, though it works well enough without it. One thing’s for sure though — I’ll definitely be coming back to this one off and on as I try to clean up them missing gold medals.

Release Date: March 12, 2021
No. of Players: 1 player
Category: Puzzle, Casual
Publisher: The Socially Awkward Studio
Developer: The Socially Awkward Studio

A review code was provided by the publisher.

Our review policy.

Sokodice

8

If you're in the mood for a mobile-like puzzle experience, I highly recommend Sokodice. Conceptually, it's easy to pick up, new mechanics are regularly added to increase puzzle variety and difficulty, and it's practically designed to fit perfectly in those little gaps in your day when you only have a few minutes to spare.

Pros
  • Simple design, preventing the game from getting bogged down in extraneous details
  • Continuous stream of new mechanics provides nice sense of progression
  • Fair difficulty curve, culminating in some real challenges
Cons
  • No hint system
Steven Rollins
Steven has been involved in video game reporting for over five years now. In his spare time, he can be found speedrunning, writing fanfiction, or watching as much anime as he possibly can.

You may also like