official website Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels website Super Mario Bros. 2 website Nintendo Japan instruction manuals

Some younger readers might have a hard time imagining it, but yes, there was an epoch of human history where the internet didn’t exist, at least not in a widespread capacity. Nintendo created Super Mario Bros. and its Japanese sequel (later released as part of Super Mario All-Stars on SNES as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels) for Famicom during that dark era, so they of course never received an official website. But now that’s changed. Nintendo Japan has created official websites for Super Mario Bros. and The Lost Levels, depicting the games’ visuals and details from their instruction booklets in an attractive new layout.

For good measure, the actual instruction booklets for each game are included digitally too, if you happen to be fluent in Japanese or just want to admire cute illustrations. This all seems to be just another fun way that Nintendo is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the revolutionary sidescrolling series.

According to sister site Siliconera, the instruction manual for the original Super Mario Bros. describes a dark piece of often-forgotten lore: Bowser transformed all the Toads in the Mushroom Kingdom into question blocks and bricks. That implies that… Mario might be killing tons of Toads during his quest? Eep. Also, the Lost Levels website is apparently straightforward about confessing the game is mostly just a more challenging version of the original game. That’s good; honesty is important.

official website Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels website Super Mario Bros. 2 website Nintendo Japan instruction manuals

official website Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels website Super Mario Bros. 2 website Nintendo Japan instruction manuals

Let us know what you think of these official Super Mario Bros. websites that Nintendo has cooked up for Japan.

John Friscia
Head Copy Editor for Enthusiast Gaming. I'm a writer who loves Super Nintendo and Japanese role-playing games to an impractical degree. I really miss living in South Korea.

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